BEST HIKING TRAILS IN WILLITS

Willits has some amazing Hiking Trails like Haehl Creek Trail and Thimbleberry Trail. Explore some of the most scenice hiking trails in the beautiful redwood forest

Hiking Trails are such a modern day activity to explore the area, and what another way than to visit some of the most scenic Hiking trails in willits.

please do visit and explore what makes Willits such an amazing place to visit!

best hiking trails in willits

Haehl Creek Trail

The Haehl Creek Trail, located adjacent to the new Frank R. Howard Memorial Hospital, is now officially open to the public.

The trail, open to all pedestrians, equestrians, and cyclists, winds along for 3,300 feet, passing by the Commonwealth Gardens, under plenty of nice shady locations, and will soon be equipped with benches, tables, stepping stones and plaques to honor the project sponsors.

Thimbleberry Trail

One of the most serene trails in the Brooktrails greenbelt is the Thimbleberry Trail. This predominantly level trail meanders alongside Willits Creek beneath redwoods, Douglas firs and big-leaf maples for 1.32 miles before it ends at the Last Chance Trail. A wide and easy trail, Thimbleberry features four creek crossings and abundant spring wildflowers.

BROOKTRAILS PAR COURSE

Perhaps the most visited trail in Brooktrails, this mostly flat course features multiple exercise stations, a baseball field, and a children’s playground. Perfect for families, runners, and people just out for a stroll, the Par Course offers something for everyone.

Inlet Trails

Just up from the Brooktrails Community Offices is the Inlet Trail, one of the most picturesque of the greenbelt trails. Seasonally very wet with many creek crossings, the trail follows Inlet Creek and becomes quite steep before ending at Goose Road. Only .85 miles each way, Inlet showcases towering redwoods and Douglas fir trees.

LITTLE DARBY NATURE TRAIL

Managed by the Bureau of Land Management, this lovely trail just 5 miles outside of Willits starts along Little Creek and takes the hiker through riparian, sylvan, and chaparral plant communities in a one-mile loop. Interpretive signs offer insight into the plants and animals who make Little Darby home.

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